Subversion

The directory we were given for the course is in a public_html folder so its accessible from the web and our directory gives permissions to a bunch of people to view the directory and I didn't know if the course staff wanted me screwing with permissions of directories inside of that, so I just created the svn repository on my andrew afs space instead of in our group's website space. If you have any questions about it, let me know.

The website is in the svn repo, so if anyone wants to modify the website they should check it out, make their changes, and then type "make website". I made a makefile with appropriate copy commands. It copies the files in each folder individually so there is a copy command per folder. So if you add files you should be fine, but if you add folders, you will have to update the makefile before typing make website. The reason I did this is because svn leaves lots of hidden .svn folders so if I just did a recursive cp of top level directory then all those .svn folders would get copied over to our class ece space.

To checkout:
svn co svn+ssh://<your username here>@unix.andrew.cmu.edu/afs/andrew.cmu.edu/usr10/jknichel/18-549

Let me know if there are any problems.

Table of some of the major versions:

Revision number Stable? Notes
5 yes has the website as of 6pm on 2/18/08
14 yes has the app doing some stuff
18 yes has some tabbed pane stuff working
23 yes started working on the calendar widget
30 yes calendar app can pull down ical data from a gmail icall address and display it
33 yes added midsemester presentation to website

Usefule subversion commands:

svn add <fileName>
Add a file to the repository
svn up
update your working copy to the most recent in the repository
  • G means it merged the file
  • C means there was a conflict
  • U means it updated the file
svn revert <fileName>
revert a file with local modifications to the most recent version of the file in the repository
svn status
See the svn status of all the files in your current directory (does it do sub directories also?). If the file has a question mark as its status, that means that you have not added it to the repository yet. Running a svn status before you commit is a good way of making sure that you did not forget to add any newly created files to the repository.
  • ? means you haven't added the file
  • A means you have told it to add the file
  • M means you have modified the file
  • D means you have told it to delete the file
svn log -v —limit <number>
shows the <number> most recent commit log messages that modify files in your current directory or sub directories (-v means it also shows what files were changed. you can leave the -v out if you only want the messages). You don't get any log messages for commits that happened after the last time you ran "svn up" (even if the commits were your commits)
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